The Martyrology
of the
Sacred Order of Friars Preachers

Translated by REV. W. R. BONNIWELL, O. P.
Published with the Approbation of the MOST REV. T. S. McDERMOTT, O. P.,
Vicar General of the Order of Preachers
THE NEWMAN PRESS - WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND -- 1955

INTRODUCTION THE RUBRICS MOVABLE FEASTS ANNIVERSARIES
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

TO OUR BELOVED FATHERS, BROTHERS, AND SISTERS OF THE ORDER OF FRIARS PREACHERS, WE FATHER TERENCE STEPHEN MCDERMOTT MASTER OF SACRED THEOLOGY AND THE HUMBLE VICAR GENERAL AND SERVANT OF THE ENTIRE ORDER OF FRIARS PREACHERS
GREETINGS AND BLESSINGS:

With the rapid growth of the liturgical movement especially in the last quarter of a century, there has been an increasing volume of requests from Dominican Sisters and Lay Tertiaries for an English translation of both our Breviary and Martyrology. It is with pleasure, therefore, that I am able to announce the fulfillment of these desires. The Breviary, translated by Father Aquinas Byrnes, O.P., is now in the process of publication at Rome, while the translation of the Dominican Martyrology has just been completed.

The Martyrology is one of the six official books of the Church's liturgy, and its use in the choral recitation of the Divine Office is obligatory. Because of the salutary effects derived from the reading of this sacred volume, various Pontiffs have urged its use by those who recite the Office privately. Indeed, not a few pious laymen are wont to read daily this great book of the saints, and in many convents it is the custom to read in the refectory at the beginning of the evening meal the Martyrology for the following day.

This is indeed a praiseworthy practice and one that might well be introduced in all our houses. For, day after day, the sacred volume sets before us men, women, and children, from every walk of life, who chose God in preference to anything the world could offer. Daily there is held up before our eyes the shining examples of heroic Christians who sacrificed all and endured all -- even the most prolonged and agonizing tortures-rather than offend God. It is impossible to listen to this stirring narrative of the saints without being deeply moved by it.

We therefore recommend the following careful translation of the Dominican Martyrology to all our convents as well as to our devout Lay Tertiaries, in the confident belief that by its daily reading we will give glory to God and His saints, participate more fully in the liturgical spirit of the Church, and be spurred to a closer imitation of those heroes and heroines of God whose eternal happiness we hope one day to share.

Given at Rome, in our Venerable Monastery of Santa Sabina, on the Feast of All Saints of our Order, November 12,1954.

FATHER TERENCE S. McDERMOTT, 0. P.
Vicar General of the Order of Preachers


Introduction

The origins of the Martyrology go back to the earliest period of the Church. During the persecutions that were waged century after century against the Christians, the local authorities of various churches compile lists of the faithful who died for Christ. Gradually local lists were enriched with the names of illustrious martyrs from other churches, until finally the local lists gave way to general martyrologies which embraced the universal Church.

The most famous of the general martyrologies was the one compiled about the year 475 and which was erroneously attributed to St. Jerome. In the Middle Ages, varying versions of the so-called Hieronyman Martyrology were in circulation, the most popular being the one edited by the monk Usuard (d. c. 875). It was his version the Dominican Order adopted in the thirteenth century and which several centuries later became the official version of the Church.

The Roman Martyrology has undergone a number of revisions and corrections from Gregory XIII to Benedict XV. The Dominican Order has profited by these scholarly labors and incorporated the results in its own Martyrology. However, the Order has not issued a new Martyrology since 1925, and since then many additions and changes have been officially authorized. All these changes and additions have been incorporated in their proper places in this translation, so that we have the anomaly of a translation being up to date, while the official version is not.

The ancient compilers of the Martyrology presupposed in the reader al considerable knowledge of the lives of the saints. Without such a knowledge, many of the allusions are lost. To have explained all such references would have required too many footnotes; but in a number of instances an explanatory word or phrase (always in parentheses) has been inserted in the text or placed in a footnote. Everything in parentheses, and all footnotes, have been added by the translator; they are not in the original text.

The Latin edition has one hundred and eighty-five folio pages devoted to a Tractatus de Pronuntiatione Lunae, to the Office of Pretiosa, and to a complete index of all the saints. It has been regarded as unnecessary to: add all this extra material. The modern Ordo renders the Tractatus superfluous, while the entire Office of Pretiosa is given in the Breviary. Instead of a huge index of some four thousand five hundred names, there is given an index of all the feasts and the saints special to the Dominican Order. In assigning ranks to the various feasts, I have followed the latest edition of our breviary -- that of 1952.

W. R. B.

The Rubrics of the Martyrology

The martyrology is read every day of the year and always a day in advance of the actual date of the lesson; thus, on December 31 is read the lesson for January 1; on January I, the lesson for January 2, etc. When he finishes reading a lesson, the reader always adds:

"And elsewhere, many other holy martyrs, confessors and holy virgins." And the choir responds: "Thanks be to God."

Since the dates of movable feasts change from year to year, they could not be inserted in the text of the martyrology. The list of such feasts is herewith given so that the reader, immediately after announcing the date of the lesson, may insert the proper movable feast at the very beginning of the lesson for the day. A movable feast is always announced on the day before the date given below.

The Movable Feasts
1. SUNDAY BETWEEN THE CIRCUMCISION AND THE EPIPHANY:
The Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus. A totum duplex feast of the first class.

2. SUNDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF THE EPIPHANY:
Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph -- a Family that offers Christian homes the most holy examples, and from it may be invoked opportune help. A totum duplex feast.

3. SEPTUAGESIMA SUNDAY:
Septuagesima Sunday -- the Sunday on which is discontinued the Canticle of the Lord -- the Alleluia.

4. THURSDAY AFTER SEXAGESIMA SUNDAY:
Transferal of the body of St. Catherine of Siena, virgin, of the Order of Preachers. A totum duplex least.

5. WEDNESDAY AFTER QUINQUAGESIMA SUNDAY:
Ash Wednesday and the beginning of the fast of the holy season of Lent.

6. FRIDAY AFTER PASSION SUNDAY:
Feast of the Compassion of the most Blessed Virgin Mary. A totum duplex feast.

7. PALM SUNDAY.
Palm Sunday, when our Lord Jesus Christ, in accordance with the prophecy of Zacharias, entered Jerusalem, seated on the colt of an ass, and the people met Him, with branches of palm-trees.

8. THURSDAY OF HOLY WEEK:
The Lord's Supper, when Christ Jesus, on the day before He was crucified for our salvation, gave to His disciples the mysteries of His Body and Blood to be celebrated.

9. FOR THE HOLY DAY OF EASTER, BEFORE THE DAY OF THE MONTH IS ANNOUNCED:
"On this day, which the Lord has made, the solemnity of solemnities and our Pasch -- the Resurrection of our Saviour Jesus Christ according to the flesh. A totum duplex least of the first class with a most solemn octave." The date is now announced and then the lesson of the Martyrology for Easter is read.

10. THE THIRD WEDNESDAY AFTER EASTER:
The Solemnity of St. Joseph, confessor, spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The Sovereign Pontiff, Pius IX, acceding to the wishes and prayers of the entire Catholic world, declared him to be the patron of the universal Church. A totum duplex feast of the first class with a solemn octave.

11. THE ASCENSION:
On Mount Olivet, the Ascension of our Lord Jesus Christ. A totum duplex feast of the first class with a most solemn octave.

12. PENTECOST:
The day of Pentecost, on which the Holy Ghost came upon the disciples at Jerusalem in tongues of fire. A totum duplex feast of the first class with a most solemn octave.

13. SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST:
Feast of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity. A totum duplex feast of the first class with a solemn octave.

14. THURSDAY AFTER TRINITY SUNDAY:
Feast of the Most Holy Body of Christ, instituted by Urban IV. Totum duplex feast of the first class with a most solemn octave.

15. FRIDAY AFTER OCTAVE OF CORPUS CHRISTI:
Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. A totum duplex feast the first class with a most solemn octave.

16. FIRST SUNDAY OF OCTOBER:
The Commemoration of Our Lady of Victory, which Pope Plus V instituted to be made annually, on account of the famous victory gained on this very day by the Christians in a naval battle against the Turks, by the assistance of the same Mother of God. However, Gregory XIII decreed that for the same victory there should be celebrated on the first Sunday of this month the annual solemnity of the Rosary of the Most Blessed Virgin. A totum duplex feast of the first class with a solemn octave.

17. LAST SUNDAY OF OCTOBER:
Feast of our Lord Jesus Christ, the King. A totum duplex feast of the first class.

The Anniversaries of the Order

Throughout the martyrology all anniversaries are indicated by a cross. When the anniversary is that of the death of a master general, the reader should prefix the words: "The death of the venerable brother..."

JANUARY

8. Joseph Maria Larroca of Spain, 74th master general of the Order.
18. Barnabas of Vercelli, 15th master general of the Order.

FEBRUARY

4. Anniversary of our Fathers and Mothers; likewise, Vincent Ajello of Lucania, in the Kingdom of Naples, 72nd master general of the Order.
9. Andrew Frühwirth of Austria, 75th master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
19. Munio of Spain, 7th master general of the Order.
21. Augustine Pipia, 61st master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
23. John of Moulins, 20th master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
26. Antoninus Cloche of France, 6oth master general of the Order.

MARCH

1. Peter of Palma, 18th master general of the Order.
3. Stephen Usodimare, 46th master general of the Order.
9. Francis Ferdinand Jabalot of Parma, 68th master general of the Order.
16. Leonard Dati of Florence, 25th master general of the Order.

APRIL

8. Garin of Gy in Gaul, 19th master general of the Order.
12. Aylmer of Piacenza, 12th master general of the Order.
21. Garcia of Loaysa, of Spain, 39th master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.

MAY

2. Louis Theissling of Alkmaar, 77th master general of the Order.
6. John Baptist de Marinis of Rome, 57th master general of the Order.
16. Peter Rochin, 27th master general of the Order.
25. Nicholas Ridolfi of Florence, 55th master general of the Order.

JUNE

7. Simon of Langres, 2ist master general of the Order.
11. Antoninus Bremond of Marseilles, 63rd master general of the Order.
13. John Thomas de Rocaberti of Spain, 58th master general of the Order.
16. Sixtus Fabri of Lucca, 50th master general of the Order.
20. Elias Raymond of Toulouse, 22nd master general of the Order; and Balthazar de Quiñones, 65th master general of the Order.
25. Leonard de Mansuetis of Perugia, 31st master general of the Order.

JULY

6. John du Feynier, 42nd master general of the Order.
9. Thomas Hyacinth Cipolletti of Ascoli, 70th master general of the Order.
12. Anniversary of all who are buried in our cemeteries.
14. Humbert of Romans, 5th master general of the Order.
20. Francis Romeo, 45th master general of the Order.
27. Gerard de Daumar, 17th master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
29. Barnabas Sassone of Naples, 34th master general of the Order.

AUGUST
1. Joachim Torriani of Venice, 35th master general of the Order.
3. Hippolytus Maria Beccaria of Monreale, 51st master general of the Order.
4. Bartholomew Comazio of Bologna, 33rd master general of the Order.
7. Thomas (Paccoroni) of Fermo, 24th master general of the Order.
8. Hugh de Vaucemain of Gaul, 16th master general of the Order.
9. Hervé de Nédellec of Brittainy, 14th master general of the Order; and John Clérée of Gaul, 37th master general of the Order.
12. Bonaventure Garcia de Paredes of Spain, 78th master general of the Order.
27. Vincent Bandelli of Lombardy, 36th master general of the Order.
28. Albert de Chiavari of Genoa, 10th master general of the Order.
29. Angelus Dominic Ancarani, of Faenza, 71st master general of the Order.
30. Augustine Galamini, 53rd master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of
the Holy Roman Church.

SEPTEMBER
1. Bererigarius of Landorra, 13th master general of the Order.
4. Martin Stanislaus Gillet of France, 79th master general of the Order.
5. Anniversary of the familiares and benefactors of our Order.
9. Thomas de Vio Cajetan, 38th master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
12. Jerome Xavierre of Saragossa, 52nd master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
15. Salvo Casseta of Sicily, 32nd master general of the Order.
17. Bernard of Jusix, 11th master general of the Order; and Paul Constable of Ferrara, 49th master general of the Order.
21. Martial Auribelli of Avignon, 29th master general of the Order.
22. Thomag Ripoll of Tarragona, 62nd master general of the Order.
24. Francis Silvestri of Ferrara, 4oth master general of the Order; and Seraphin Secci of Pavia, 54th master general of the Order.
27. Maurice Benedict Olivieri of Salluzo, 69th master general of the Order.

OCTOBER
9. Paul Butigella, 41st master general of the Order.
15. Bartholomew Texier, 26th master general of the Order.
28. Vincent Guistiniani of Chios, 47th master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.

NOVEMBER
4. John the Teuton, 4th master general of the Order.
7. Anthony de Monroy of Mexico, 59th master general of the Order.
10. Anniversary of all the Brothers and Sisters of our Order.
16. Albert de las Casas of Spain, 44th master general of the Order.
18. Guido Flamochetti, 28th master general of the Order.
21. Stephen of Besançon, 8th master general of the Order; and Seraphin Cavalli of Brescia, 48th master general of the Order.

DECEMBER
1. Thomas Turco of Cremona, 56th master general of the Order. Joachim Briz of Spain, 67th master general of the Order. Alexander Vincent Jandel of Nancy in France, 73rd master general of the Order.
15. Conrad d'Asti, 30th master general of the Order.
16. John Thomas de Boxadors, 64th master general of the Order. He was also a cardinal of the Holy Roman Church.
17. Hyacinth Maria Cormier of Orleans, 76th master general of the Order.
20. Augustine Recuperati, 43rd master general of the Order.
23. Pius Joseph Gaddi, 66th master general of the Order.


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